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Russell Viers

I'm just a guy who finds the world an interesting place and likes to capture certain moments with a camera. They aren't for sale, or anything. I just like them. Well, usually. I've taken a lot of photos I don't like, as well.

Author

About the Author

Russell Viers

I'm just a guy who finds the world an interesting place and likes to capture certain moments with a camera. They aren't for sale, or anything. I just like them. Well, usually. I've taken a lot of photos I don't like, as well.

December 22, 2018

Losing Her Allsup's Burrito Virginity

For the whole story here, I need to backtrack about seven years, maybe. Not sure, my life’s been a blur.

I was driving home from Pampa, TX and staying off the main roads. I wanted to see what was going on behind the scenes.

As I cruised north, heading to the edge of Texas, I saw a sign for a town named Canadian. “Is that where they make the bacon,” I wondered as I changed course and headed east on a pretty neglected piece of county asphalt.

Now Canadian is easier said than done. As I drove along the countryside I could see it off in the distance, but had to go around a bit to actually get there.

“What a cute little town,” I thought as I drove around. Heading up the main road toward the courthouse on the hill I saw “The Canadian Record” sign and knew I had to stop.

As I walked in to pick up a copy of the local rag, I laid my buck in the basket and heard “Russell? ... Russell Viers? What are you doing in Canadian, Texas?”

“Just driving through,” I answered.

“You’re a liar,” this lady replied. “Nobody just drives through Canadian, Texas.”

That lady is Laurie Ezzell Brown and she’s the owner/publisher of the multi-generational local newspaper.

I don’t know her side of the story, but from my point of view, that was the beginning of a great friendship.

So when planning this trip, and looking at the map, I knew I had to drop in again on my way home.

Laurie and I met for coffee this morning and the conversation flowed like the coffee dulce de leches we were drinking. We caught up. We laughed a lot. We solved all the world’s problems. Well, almost.

I learned there was one problem yet unsolved.

I told Laurie how the day before I had lived on Allsup’s Beef and Been burritos. I assumed, just like ANY proud Texan, Laurie had consumed her share over the years.

“I’ve never had one,” she confessed.

I was FLOORED!!!

“It’s not that I won’t eat one,” she explained, “it’s just that I don’t want to walk out of there smelling like Allsup’s.”

“SO,” I contrived, “if we were to go over there, and you waited outside, and I BROUGHT you one, would you eat it?”

“Hell yes,” she answered.

So in the Rambler we hopped, along with Mary from the office, and the three of us headed to the gas station.

The pics you see here are of Laurie’s first Allsup’s gas station Beef and Bean Burrito. I can’t give an accurate figure on what number that is for me. Let’s just say it was my fourth THIS WEEK!!! (Editor’s note: I had a couple more on my drive home...I love them).

Laurie had to admit they are good eating. And at less than $3 each, they make a cheap date.

What a fun morning with old friends.

And I will NOT admit that we had a shot of tequila back at the office to wash the taste out of our mouths.

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